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Camino Portugues

Portuguese Way | Camino de Santiago

The Portuguese Way or Camino Portugués starts in Lisbon, Portugal and stretches across the Western Coast of Spain, finishing in Santiago de Compostela.

  • Is the second most famous route to the Camino de Santiago.
  • You will get a more rural experience, away from the big cities and crowds of people.
  • The Camino Portuguese is the best route for wine lovers, as vineyards and grapes flourish along the way.
  • The beautiful coastal scenery between portugal and spain makes the summer heat more bearable.
  • Pleasant to walk, with restaurants, pilgrim hostels (albergues) and services.
  • Main cities & towns - Portugal: Lisboa, Santarém, Coimbra, Albergaria a-Velha, Porto, Barcelos, Ponte de Lima. Spain: Tui, Caldas de Rei, Santiago de Compostela

Total distance: 620km

Weather

  • Summer – very warm (between 23° to 27° June-Aug)
  • Fall – warm and rainy (between 20° to 25° Sep-Nov)
  • Winter – cold (average 14°)
  • Spring – cool (average 17° to 20° March-May)

Suitable for cycling: Yes

Camino Portugues history

The Portuguese way became more popular since the 12th century, after the Portuguese independence lead by King Alfonso I. Pilgrims who started their way in Portugal walked to the North not only motivated by spiritual reasons. Cultural and economic reasons create human links between these neighbor territories, still alive today. In the 20 century, it suffered a stagnation because of the Virgin’s apparition to three shepherds in Fátima (Portugal); the virgin’s sanctuary became more famous. However, the St James’ devotion came back again really soon and the way became also famous internationally.

This camino portugues is a route full of history that brought cultural and commercial exchanges between Galicia and Portugal. There were monarchs, nobles, and clerics that walked to Santiago to show their devotion and faith to Saint James. There are documentary evidence of these pilgrimages such as the Elizabeth of Portugal’s pilgrimage, who after walking through Camino to Santiago in the 14 century gave her empress Holy Roma Empire crown to Santiago’s altar; after her death she was buried in Coímbra with some pilgrim staff as she wanted. King Manuel I of Portugal (the Fortunate) who walked from Lisbon in 1502, asked for a lamp to illuminate Santiago’s cathedral all day and night. Other people that also walked through this way were: the Jesuits priests walked this camino route from Coímbra in 1543; Francisco de Holanda in 1549, who was a painter, humanist and architect from Portugal; Tui’s bishop in 1604; or Ponte de Lima’s viscount in 1610.

Portuguese Camino distance

A lot of people ask how long is the Camino Portugues, but it depends on where your starting point is. If you start your Portuguese Way in Lisbon, the full distance to Santiago de Compostela is 620km. If you start the Camino Portuguese in Porto, the total distance is 260km following the coastal route. You can do the Camino through the central route, which is 20km shorter, but the stunning views and landscape of the coastal walk are worth the extra kilometers.

About the Camino Portuguese coastal route

You will find the most stunning coastal scenery along the Portuguese way. The path crosses breathtaking towns and cities of North Portugal, like Lisbon, Coimbra, Oporto, Barcelos, Ponte de Lima and Valença do Minho. From the South to the North going through many different sceneries. There lots of routes that are from the Romanesque Ages such as the route built in the 1 century AD to link Braga and Astorga.

There are two different ways: one of them known as the Portuguese Way, where the entire route goes through the coastline and enters in Galicia through A Guarda, Baiona, Vigo and Redondela; and an alternative route, which is more famous and busy; it enters in Galicia through Tui, o Porriño, Redondela, Pontevedra, Caldas de Reis and Padrón before get to Santiago de Compostela where you can hug St James’ image. The Portuguese Way goes through forest-magic paths, small villages, country houses, fortresses, and also crosses some rivers through medieval bridges. After a long day of walking or cycling, there is nothing better than the beautiful sandy beaches South Galicia and diving into the clear blue water of Cies Islands, Sanxenxo and Baiona.

Why choosing the Portuguese Way

The Camino Portugués is the most second way for a reason. Magic paths, small villages, country houses, fortresses and medieval bridges complete the magical paths that form this popular walk.It is a different way, we won’t find plateaus, difficult elevations nor big variations in relative altitude that is what we can find in the French Way, but we can find forests and millenary stone crosses that hide troubadour’s songs from the medieval ages and also Cantigas de Amigo, Amor, and Maldecir of Martín Códax and Mendiño.

The Camino portugues is also a well-known route amongst wine lovers. North Portugal and South Galicia scenery is mainly conformed by vineyards, where you can taste unique artisan wines. If magic and wine haven´t convinced you yet, the Portuguese Way is quite easy to walk, as most paths are flat and not as overcrowded as the French Way. Chapels, churches and convents are our traveling companion in this adventure that year after year is more consolidated. In the last few years it became one of the most walked routes just after the French Way. This way is well indicated, especially in Galicia. The number of establishments is increasing more and more with a great variety of public and private hostels, especially after leaving Porto. Since it is not an overcrowded way and because of its natural beauty this way is a great option to walk to Santiago.

Stages of the Camino Portugues

StagesRouteKmInfo
Stage 1
Lisboa - Alhandra28
Stage 2
Alhandra - Azambuja18
Stage 3
Azambuja - Santarém23
Stage 4
Santarém - Golega30
Stage 5
Golega - Tomar22
Stage 6
Tomar - Alvaiázere32
Stage 7
Alvaiázere - Rabaçal33
Stage 8
Rabaçal - Coimbra32
Stage 9
Coimbra - Mealhada26
Stage 10
Mealhada - Águeda31
Stage 11
Águeda - Albergaria a Velha21,5
Stage 12
Albergaria a Velha - Oliveira de Azeméis23
Stage 13
Oliveira de Azeméis - Grijó33,5
Stage 14
Grijó - Oporto23,5
Stage 15
Oporto - Vilarinho26,5
Stage 16
Vilarinho - Barcelos27,3
Stage 17
Barcelos - Ponte da Lima34,5
Stage 18
Ponte da Lima - Rubiaes17,4
Stage 19
Rubiaes - Tui19,1
Stage 20
Tui - O Porriño13
Stage 21
O Porriño - Redondela16
Stage 22
Redondela - Pontevedra19
Stage 23
Pontevedra - Caldas de Reis19
Stage 24
Caldas de Reis - Padrón17
Stage 25
Padrón - Santiago de Compostela22
Show more

Castle of St. George

The Castle of San Jorge rises on the highest hill of Lisbon, granting to the visitor a spectacular view of the city.

Santa Clara a Velha

This Gothic monastery is an emblematic monument of Coimbra because of its complex history as well as the romantic character of its ruins.

Lello e Irmao

This magical corner of the city of Oporto served as the stage in the filming of the Harry Potter films.

Tui Cathedral

This impressive fortress-like cathedral has its origins in the 13th century, proof of the importance of the town of Tui in the Middle Ages.

Walking: 25 Stages / 620 km

Stage 1

Etapa 1 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 28 km (17,4 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 2

Etapa 2 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 18 km (11,2 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 3

Etapa 3 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 23 km (14,3 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 4

Etapa 4 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 30 km (18,6 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 5

Etapa 5 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 22 km (13,7 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 6

Etapa 6 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 32 km (20 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 7

Etapa 7 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 33 km (20,5 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 8

Etapa 8 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 32 km (20 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 9

Etapa 9 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 26 km (16,1 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 10

Etapa 10 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 31 km (19,3 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 11

Etapa 11 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 21,5 km (13,4 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 12

Etapa 12 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 23 km (14,3 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 13

Etapa 13 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 33,5 km (21 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 14

Etapa 14 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 23,5 km (14,6 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 15

oporto-vilarinho
  • Length: 26,5 km (16,5 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 16

vilarinho-barcelos
  • Length: 27,3 km (17 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 17

Etapa 17 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 34,5 km (21,4 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 18

Etapa 18 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 17,4 km (10,8 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 19

Etapa 19 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 19,1 km (11,8 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 20

Etapa 20 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 13 km (8 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 21

Etapa 21 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 16 km (10 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 22

Etapa 22 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 19 km (11,8 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 23

Etapa 23 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 19 km (11,8 miles)
  • Hardness:

Stage 24

Etapa 24 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 17 km (10,5 miles)
  • Hardness:

Etapa 25

Etapa 25 Camino Portugués
  • Length: 22 km (13,7 miles)
  • Hardness:

Cycling (From Oporto): 5 Stages / 237 km

StagesPathKmHardness
Stage 1Oporto - Barcelos53
Stage 2Barcelos - Rubiães51
Stage 3Rubiães - Redondela53
Stage 4Redondela - Caldas de Reis41
Stage 5Caldas de Reis - Santiago de Compostela39
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