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  • 25 kms /day approx.
  • 70 kms /day approx.

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Camino Aragonés

Stages on foot / Stages by bike

Camino Francés through Aragón

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Stages on foot

6 stages / 205 km

Stage 1

Camino Aragonés Stage 1

Length: 32 km (20 miles)

Difficulty:

Stage 2

Camino Aragonés Stage 2

Length: 25.4 km

Difficulty:

Stage 3

Camino Aragonés Stage 3

Length: 28.4 km

Difficulty:

Stage 4

Camino Aragonés Stage 4

Length: 22 km (13.7 miles)

Difficulty:

Stage 5

Camino Aragonés Stage 5

Length: 27.2 km

Difficulty:

Stage 6

Camino Aragonés Stage 6

Longitud: 30.6 km

Difficulty:

Camino Aragonés Stages by Bike

3 stages / 166 km
Stages Path Km Difficulty
Stage 1 Somport – Santa Cilia 47,2
Stage 2 Santa Cilia – Sangüesa 60,6
Stage 3 Sangüesa – Puente la Reina 57,8

Frequent Questions about the Camino Aragonés

Just as we have described in the section about stages, the Camino Aragonés is made up of a total of 6 stages over a distance of 205 km, beginning in the border town of Somport. If you do the Camino Aragonés by bicycle, there will be 3 stages.

Along this route you will pass through several different towns that each have their own particular charm, namely: Jaca, Arrés, Sangüesa o Monreal, among others.

The River Aragón travels with you along much of this route, and in the town of Jaca, you shouldn’t miss the opportunity to appreciate its Cathedral and Citadel (formerly known as the Castle of San Pedro).

The Camino Aragonés, also called the Camino Francés via Aragón, is one of the many secondary routes that exist throughout the Camino de Santiago. It’s a relatively unknown route and therefore doesn’t offer a wide range of accommodation for pilgrims.

On Pilgrim.es we have much more complete information about this, and many more routes. Check out our website to discover all the routes that make up the Camino de Santiago; its stages, maps and even its villages with recommendations on what to see in each one.